Wednesday, 14 November 2018

Uploading files to Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 DAM using Asset Manager API

You can create an Adobe Experience Manager application that lets a user select a file from their local desktop and upload it to AEM Digital Asset Manager (DAM).  For example, assume you want your customers to upload photos taken from a mobile device and upload to enter a local contest.


Using an Experience Manager component that is developed in this article, an image can be uploaded from the web site to the Experience Manager DAM.



The Experience Manager component posts the selected image to a Sling Servlet. The Sling Servlet uses the AssetManager API to place the uploaded file into the DAM, as shown in the following illustration.


To read this development article, check back on Fri Nov 16, 2018.

Tuesday, 6 November 2018

Working with Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 Content Fragments

Have you ever wondered how to easily create text snippets in Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 and store them in the JCR repository, for easy re-use when authoring web pages, mobile applications, social content, and so on?

In Experience Manager 6.4, you can use content fragments that let you create original content in Experience Manager, enabling copy writers to create editorial content before it is being authored in a page, and to further allow curating such content by creating channel specific variations and by associating collections with relevant media content. As a result, web producers receive content that is prepared and "ready to go”, enabling them to focus on assembling content across channels, globally and on a local level.

The following illustration shows the Content Fragment created in this article.



Join the Experience League

To become an Experience Business, you need more than just great tools and online help. You need a partner. Experience League is a new enablement program with guided learning to help you get the most out of Adobe Experience Cloud. With training materials, one-to-one expert support, and a thriving community of fellow professionals, Experience League is a comprehensive program designed to help you become your best.

Join the Adobe Experience League by clicking this banner.




I (Scott Macdonald) am a Senior Experience League Community Manager at Adobe Systems with 20 years in the high tech industry. I am also a programmer with knowledge in Java, JavaScript, C#,C++, HTML, XML and ActionScript. If  you would like to see more AEM or other end to end articles like this, then leave a comment and let me know what content you would like to see.

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmacdonald2010

YouTube: Subscribe to the AEM Community Channel. 

Saturday, 3 November 2018

Creating an Event Listener for Adobe Experience Manager 6.4

You can develop a custom JCR Event Listener for Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 that responds to events that occur at the JCR level. For example, you can write an event handler to respond to the following JCR events:


  • A node was added
  • A node was moved
  • A node was deleted
  • A property was added to a node
  • A property was changed
  • A property was deleted


To create an AEM event handler, you create an OSGi bundle that contains a class that implements javax.jcr.observation.EventListener. For information, see EventListener.

To read this article - click: https://helpx.adobe.com/experience-manager/using/aem64_event_listener.html 


Join the Experience League

To become an Experience Business, you need more than just great tools and online help. You need a partner. Experience League is a new enablement program with guided learning to help you get the most out of Adobe Experience Cloud. With training materials, one-to-one expert support, and a thriving community of fellow professionals, Experience League is a comprehensive program designed to help you become your best.

Join the Adobe Experience League by clicking this banner.




I (Scott Macdonald) am a Senior Experience League Community Manager at Adobe Systems with 20 years in the high tech industry. I am also a programmer with knowledge in Java, JavaScript, C#,C++, HTML, XML and ActionScript. If  you would like to see more AEM or other end to end articles like this, then leave a comment and let me know what content you would like to see.

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmacdonald2010

YouTube: Subscribe to the AEM Community Channel. 

Thursday, 1 November 2018

[Webinar |November] AtACE Session: Enterprise Search Solution for AEM using Apache Solr


Session Details

Join Lokesh BS, Digital Solutions Architect at TA Digital for a discussion on Enterprise Search Solution for AEM using Apache Solr, one of the critical decisions and desired by customers in the community. In this session users would understand how to integrate and use Apache Solr within AEM for the better search solution and understand the different features of Search Engine

Date: Tuesday, 27th November 2018
Time: 8:00 am PDT | 11:00 am EST | 8:30 pm IST
Duration: 60 Minutes


Direct Link:Adobe Connect Login

Join the Experience League

To become an Experience Business, you need more than just great tools and online help. You need a partner. Experience League is a new enablement program with guided learning to help you get the most out of Adobe Experience Cloud. With training materials, one-to-one expert support, and a thriving community of fellow professionals, Experience League is a comprehensive program designed to help you become your best.

Join the Adobe Experience League by clicking this banner.




I (Scott Macdonald) am a Senior Experience League Community Manager at Adobe Systems with 20 years in the high tech industry. I am also a programmer with knowledge in Java, JavaScript, C#,C++, HTML, XML and ActionScript. If  you would like to see more AEM or other end to end articles like this, then leave a comment and let me know what content you would like to see.

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmacdonald2010

YouTube: Subscribe to the AEM Community Channel. 


Querying MySQL data using an Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 DataSourcePool

You can create an Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 application that queries data located in a relational database and displays the data within a web page. In this article, you use a com.day.commons.datasource.poolservice.DataSourcePool instance to setup a connection to a MySQL database. Then you can use Java JDBC API to perform database operations, such as executing a query. For information, see Java JDBC API.

The following illustration shows the Experience Manager component developed in this article that displays data queried from MySQL.


The following illustration shows the employee table that belongs to a MySQL database. Notice that the previous illustration shows this data within an Experience Manager component.




Join the Experience League

To become an Experience Business, you need more than just great tools and online help. You need a partner. Experience League is a new enablement program with guided learning to help you get the most out of Adobe Experience Cloud. With training materials, one-to-one expert support, and a thriving community of fellow professionals, Experience League is a comprehensive program designed to help you become your best.

Join the Adobe Experience League by clicking this banner.




I (Scott Macdonald) am a Senior Experience League Community Manager at Adobe Systems with 20 years in the high tech industry. I am also a programmer with knowledge in Java, JavaScript, C#,C++, HTML, XML and ActionScript. If  you would like to see more AEM or other end to end articles like this, then leave a comment and let me know what content you would like to see.

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmacdonald2010

YouTube: Subscribe to the AEM Community Channel.





Wednesday, 31 October 2018

Querying Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 JCR data using the QueryBuilder API

You can create an Adobe Experience Manager 6.4 application that queries data located in the Java Content Repository (JCR). In this article, you use a com.day.cq.search.QueryBuilder instance that belongs to the QueryBuilder API. This API requires that you define search parameters, and an optional filter. After you execute the query, the results are stored in a result set. You can display the result set in an Experience Manager web page. For information, see Interface QueryBuilder.

The following illustration shows JCR data displayed (retrieved by using the QueryBuilder API) within an Experience Manager HTL component.


To read this development article, click https://helpx.adobe.com/experience-manager/using/querying-experience-manager-query-builder-64.html.

Join the Experience League

To become an Experience Business, you need more than just great tools and online help. You need a partner. Experience League is a new enablement program with guided learning to help you get the most out of Adobe Experience Cloud. With training materials, one-to-one expert support, and a thriving community of fellow professionals, Experience League is a comprehensive program designed to help you become your best.

Join the Adobe Experience League by clicking this banner.




I (Scott Macdonald) am a Senior Experience League Community Manager at Adobe Systems with 20 years in the high tech industry. I am also a programmer with knowledge in Java, JavaScript, C#,C++, HTML, XML and ActionScript. If  you would like to see more AEM or other end to end articles like this, then leave a comment and let me know what content you would like to see.

Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottmacdonald2010

Saturday, 27 October 2018

Building a Spring MVC Project using Maven and IntelliJ IDE 2018

(Although most of the content located on this blog is for the Adobe Experience Manager community, from time to time, I post content for the general Java community. This post is about how to set up a Spring MVC project using Maven and IntelliJ 2018)

This development article guides you through how to create a Spring MVC project by using Maven and IntelliJ IDE 2018. This article includes how to configure the Spring DispatcherServlet.

This article builds a base Spring MVC project by using a standard web application Maven Archetype. Then it includes Spring MVC dependencies into the POM file and configures Spring related XML files, such as WEB-INF/dispatcher-servlet.xml file.

Finally, the Spring MVC project is deployed to Tomcat. If you do not have TOMCAT installed, see http://tomcat.apache.org/. (This article uses Tomcat 8).
The following illustration shows the Spring MVC built in this article.




To learn how to create a Spring MVC project by using Maven and IntelliJ IDE 2018, download this PDF.